Welcome to the Wheatbelt Science Trail

There is nowhere on Earth like the Western Australian Wheatbelt. DO, SEE or LEARN at over fifty unique sites throughout the region.

Ready to start your adventure? Explore the map below or scroll down and filter your search by topics, themes and access type.

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Just south of New Norcia sits one of the world’s most advanced stations for deep-space communication. The European Space Agency’s Deep Space Ground Station has already helped to land a probe on a comet and a robot on Mars!…

If you love bushwalking and rare wildflowers, then the relatively unknown, yet beautiful nature trail at Mt Matilda should interest you!…

When is a lake not a lake? When it is an ephemeral lake! An ephemeral waterbody is one that has water for short periods, generally following a major rain event. One type of ephemeral waterbody is a playa lake chain, and the Yenyening Lakes are an excellent example of this waterbody.…

In the past, Corrigin was known as the Town of Windmills. But did replacing the waterpump windmills at Corrigin with the reliable Goldfields Pipeline have a negative effect on the town?…

Plenty of scientific studies have attempted to determine when and why dogs became domesticated. They have lived alongside humans for tens of thousands of years as working animals and companions. The Corrigin Dog Cemetery celebrates the special relationship with ‘man’s best friend’.…

Did you know that in 1964 Donald Campbell broke the world water speed record at Lake Dumbleyung? On the 31st December 1964, he managed to reach 444.71km p/h, making him the first, and only person so far, to break both land and water speed records in the same year! How did he do it? In the Bluebird – a hydroplane.…

Lake Magic is located only 1 kilometre north of the famous Wave Rock. The water is clear but salty and the lake is surrounded by white sand. The scenery is particularly spectacular at sunrise and sunset, with beautiful colour changes and sightings of kangaroos.…

You’d be hard pressed to find rocks forms with quirkier titles than Wave Rock’s companions – Hippos Yawn, Mulka’s Cave and The Humps. Not only do they feature some catchy names, they also have ancient rainforest species.…

Barna Mia is a unique way to see threatened Australian species up close on a guided night walk. Located within a predator-proof sanctuary you can see nocturnal Australian marsupials which are thriving safe from the threat of foxes and feral cats.…

Did you know Western Australia’s mammal emblem, the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus), lives right here in the Wheatbelt? The stunning Dryandra Woodland is the largest remnant of original vegetation in the western Wheatbelt and is home to over 1,000 species of plants and animals…including the numbat.…

The Kawana Walk in the Dryandra woodland is an easy 3.3km loop trail. Along the trail you will walk through both brown mallet and kwongan vegetation. You might also spot an animal that is inspiring the super fibre of the future.…

Many of the old infrastructure in Dryandra such as fire towers, cottages, dams and railways are related to its days as a brown mallet (Eucalyptus astringens) plantation. This was one of the first Australian trees to be grown in plantations as it was a useful source of tannin.…

#wheatbeltsciencetrail

The first round of sites on this map were listed in August 2017 and made possible by a Community Chest Fund grant, Inspiring Australia and our volunteers. The trail also features a Geo Trail, a series of geocaches throughout the region.

Want to know more? If you would like more information or would like to support us to add more sites to the map, visit our FAQs. To find out more about the people who made this possible see our acknowledgements page.